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The Worst real Estate Advice I Ever Got/Users/adamp/Desktop/SolutionsGuide08/images/worstAdvice

Need advice? Maybe so, but think twice before taking it! Here’s the worst advice some sales associates ever got.

“You don’t want to list in that area.”
When Larry Wechter of Fort Lauderdale first received his license about 20 years ago, he targeted the area in which he lived to become known as that community’s go-to sales associate.
His broker sternly advised, “At this office, we don’t market homes in that area.”

But Wechter kept working with his neighbors. In his first 12 months, he listed and sold more than 40 homes “in that area.” Today, he’s with
RE/MAX Partners and to date has closed nearly 1,600 sales.

“Stick by your guns, and you’ll do business,” Wechter says.

“You don’t want to see that property.”
The 4,000-square-foot penthouse was listed for $99,000. Geraldine Lovato, currently broker of Bluewater Real Estate in Orlando, and her husband, who were visiting Miami in the mid-1980s, asked to see it. The listing agent alluded that it was not the property for them.

The Lovatos went home without ever seeing the property. A couple of years ago, Lovato told that story to a cousin who lives in Miami. “He told me the place was probably worth $4 million,” she says.

“Market with wackiness.”
A motivational speaker offered this advice: Send a flier to your farm area. One week later, send a second flier, torn, messy and looking like it was fished from the garbage, labeled, “Please don’t throw this away again.”

Donna Maddox, a sales associate with the World Property Center in Kissimmee, loved the idea. But one recipient thought Maddox had really been in her trash. She threatened to have Maddox arrested, and she also called Maddox’s manager several times. “I really only wanted a listing—not possible jail time,” Maddox says.

“If at first you don’t succeed, quit.”
To diversify and survive after 9/11, Joel Greene, a broker of Condo Hotel Center in Miami, turned to condo hotel sales and bought a four-page starter Web site for $499 in 2002. Several months later, he had only a few sales.
His Web designer told him to cut his losses and quit. Greene didn’t listen.

Today, his inventory has grown from 12 properties in south Florida to nearly 200 all over the world. His site draws more than 100,000 hits every month and his database has grown to 29,000 people.
“We outgrew [the Web designer] long ago, but we never forgot the fire he lit under us to prove him wrong,” Greene says.

“Take your family along.”
Sandy Medina, a sales associate at Beachfront Realty Inc. in Aventura, wishes she’d never listened to herself.

When she first started, she had a baby boy and a ton of things to do for her family. One day, she had one last house to show, but she also had a family errand to run.
“I convinced myself, ‘Go with your family. It’s OK! Isn’t it your own business?’”

Her client was surprised to see Medina’s husband, mother, grandmother and baby waiting in the car while Medina showed the house. “It didn’t cross my mind at the time that it would be a problem,” Medina says, adding that she still remembers the client’s wide eyes.