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Realtor Code of Ethics celebrates 100th anniversary


 

SAN FRANCISCO – Nov. 8, 2013 – This year the National Association of Realtors® (NAR) celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Realtors Code of Ethics – the professional responsibilities and expectations of NAR’s 1 million Realtor members to their clients, customers, fellow Realtors and general public.

“As the leading advocate for homeowners and real estate investors, Realtors have been subscribing to NAR’s strict Code of Ethics as a condition of membership for more than 100 years,” says NAR President Gary Thomas. “Protecting the interests of consumers demands high standards of professional conduct and training, and the Code of Ethics is the golden thread that binds the Realtor community together.”

In an effort to standardize real estate practices, real estate pros founded the National Association of Real Estate Exchanges in 1908, and the group later became the National Association of Realtors. The organization’s original goal was to establish ethical standards, allow the exchange of real estate information and statistics, and to develop sound public policies on real estate matters. On July 29, 1913, the Realtor Code of Ethics was adopted.

There are currently more than 1.84 million active licensed real estate professionals in the U.S., but only 1 million are members of NAR and can call themselves Realtors. Real estate agents not members of NAR do not subscribe to a code of ethics or have access to the educational, business and market information advantages of their Realtor counterparts.

“Through the Code of Ethics, Realtors are providing consumers with a promise to protect and promote their best interests throughout the entire home buying, selling or investing process,” says Thomas.

Consumers can read more about the Code of Ethics and how it benefits them on NAR’s website.

© 2013 Florida Realtors®

Related Topics: NAR